Why it’s Cardinal to Observe the Relationship Among Mountain Wildlife, Spatial Scales, and Ecosystem Dynamics—Joshua Kesling

Many wildlife species receive support from mountain natural areas interspersed throughout the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Upper elevation field sites, ranging from 6,500-8,500 ft above sea level, cover several ecoregions or ecosystems and landscapes determined by biological, geological, chemical, and physical factors.   For instance, in the uplands beyond the freshwater shorelines, dense conifer forest stands (i.e., Read more about Why it’s Cardinal to Observe the Relationship Among Mountain Wildlife, Spatial Scales, and Ecosystem Dynamics—Joshua Kesling[…]

Why Listening to River and Riparian Distress Calls Matter—Joshua Kesling

Before taking measurements during bustling recreation events—assessing plant height, counting species diversity, recording sound levels, reading water qualities, and comparing soil compaction images—it is crucial to read ecosystem distress calls through careful observation. I call this ‘read’ a qualitative query, which involves discernment and meaningful observation of natural surroundings. Ecosystem or ‘ecological distress signals’ occur Read more about Why Listening to River and Riparian Distress Calls Matter—Joshua Kesling[…]

Toward an Understanding of Mountain Recreation Ecosystems and Key Services—Joshua Kesling

It is just before 6:00 am, and the sun has not yet greeted subalpine fir and quaking aspen tops, although they eagerly await the warm embrace. Freezing water races through riffle-pool sequences, flossing interstices full of non-vascular specialists. Lichen and moss thrive just above the water line. Despite the golden sun’s absence, moose traipse across Read more about Toward an Understanding of Mountain Recreation Ecosystems and Key Services—Joshua Kesling[…]

Capturing Outdoor Recreation and Ecological Patterns along a Multiple Use Mountain Stream

Outdoor recreation opportunities fuel important Intermountain West economies, satisfy cultural needs, and uphold nature connectedness. Similarly, mountain freshwater ecosystems promote the development and recruitment of flora and fauna. When considered together, recreation ecosystems comprise natural areas with varying levels of human and (non) human use. Some of the chief drivers shifting more visitors into stream-lined Read more about Capturing Outdoor Recreation and Ecological Patterns along a Multiple Use Mountain Stream[…]