Why Listening to River and Riparian Distress Calls Matter—Joshua Kesling

Before taking measurements during bustling recreation events—assessing plant height, counting species diversity, recording sound levels, reading water qualities, and comparing soil compaction images—it is crucial to read ecosystem distress calls through careful observation. I call this ‘read’ a qualitative query, which involves discernment and meaningful observation of natural surroundings. Ecosystem or ‘ecological distress signals’ occur Read more about Why Listening to River and Riparian Distress Calls Matter—Joshua Kesling[…]

Tanged Up in Seasons—Alex Wells

This past May, I traveled back in time.   From the top of East Rock Park, the stately houses and university buildings of New Haven barely poked out from beneath an overflow of green leaves. It was early May, but it already felt like summer in Connecticut. Seven days later, I’d returned to early April, the Read more about Tanged Up in Seasons—Alex Wells[…]

Making Climate Action Data More Accessible and Engaging—Ingrid Thyr

“How do you explain ‘quintile rank’ to make it easily understandable?”  “Should we use morning, afternoon, or evening temperature?”  “Should there be more narrative around this statistic?”  “How can we incorporate data or stories from users?”  “How many blurbs is too many blurbs?”  These are the sorts of questions that have been occupying my day-to-day Read more about Making Climate Action Data More Accessible and Engaging—Ingrid Thyr[…]

The Pickle’s Place—Aya Ochiai

Just inside town limits of Arco, Idaho (pop. 995), there’s an electric green building that is emblazoned “Pickle’s Place, Home of the ‘Atomic Burger!’” It stands across the street from a sign declaring “Welcome to Arco, First City in the World Lighted by Atomic Power” and a silver sculpture of an atom–a nucleus and its Read more about The Pickle’s Place—Aya Ochiai[…]

Toward an Understanding of Mountain Recreation Ecosystems and Key Services—Joshua Kesling

It is just before 6:00 am, and the sun has not yet greeted subalpine fir and quaking aspen tops, although they eagerly await the warm embrace. Freezing water races through riffle-pool sequences, flossing interstices full of non-vascular specialists. Lichen and moss thrive just above the water line. Despite the golden sun’s absence, moose traipse across Read more about Toward an Understanding of Mountain Recreation Ecosystems and Key Services—Joshua Kesling[…]

Nuclear and Renewable Energy in Idaho and the American West

Aya is working on a two part project focusing on non-fossil fuel energy in the American West and its human and environmental impacts. She is studying communities and landscapes surrounding nuclear energy testing, research, and waste storage in the Snake River Plain of Idaho. Since 1949, southeastern Idaho has been the U.S.’ center of nuclear Read more about Nuclear and Renewable Energy in Idaho and the American West[…]

Capturing Outdoor Recreation and Ecological Patterns along a Multiple Use Mountain Stream

Outdoor recreation opportunities fuel important Intermountain West economies, satisfy cultural needs, and uphold nature connectedness. Similarly, mountain freshwater ecosystems promote the development and recruitment of flora and fauna. When considered together, recreation ecosystems comprise natural areas with varying levels of human and (non) human use. Some of the chief drivers shifting more visitors into stream-lined Read more about Capturing Outdoor Recreation and Ecological Patterns along a Multiple Use Mountain Stream[…]

Supporting Climate Action in King County, WA

This summer, Ingrid is working with the Executive Climate Office of King County (Washington) on three projects related to addressing climate change at the county level: 1) contributing to an initial draft of the next 5-year Strategic Climate Action Plan for the county; 2) writing a user guide to accompany a new urban heat mapping Read more about Supporting Climate Action in King County, WA[…]